blog

temp-post-image

Scientific research continues to point toward the benefits of fasting to lose weight and improve your health. Intermittent fasting has becoming increasingly popular and has been shown to induce weight loss, improve immune regulation and slow the aging process. (You can read more about my take on intermittent fasting here.) But for those who find it difficult to commit to a full-on fast, here’s something new to consider.

It’s called the Fasting Mimicking Diet (FMD), created by Valter Longo, PhD, and it’s an alternative to fasting that allows you consume small amounts of food. Instead of abstaining from food altogether, as in a traditional fast, or even intermittent fasting, ...

Read more
temp-post-image

Have you tried every diet in the book, spent hundreds — or even thousands — on weight loss products, specialized foods and fitness products, only to find you’re right back where you began? Maybe you lost a few pounds here and there, but never found a diet plan that really worked for you, and eventually gained back any weight you’d lost.

You are not alone. But what if I told you that losing weight and keeping it off for good isn’t always about food and exercise; that “calories in vs. calories out” is a far too simplified approach to weight loss, and one that doesn’t work for everyone? There’s more to the equation.

Advancements in genetic sc...

Read more
temp-post-image

You may have seen the recent USA Today article, Coconut oil isn’t healthy. It’s never been healthy, based on a statement released by the American Heart Association advising Americans to replace saturated fat (as is found in coconut oil) with omega-6 rich polyunsaturated fatty acids from vegetable oils. The article quickly went viral on social media, causing a panic among natural foodies, crunchy moms and those who’ve used coconut as a substitute for vegetable oil and other cooking oils.

But here’s why I don’t want you to panic about coconut oil. Coconut oil is an absolutely healthy fat especially when eaten on a low carbohydrate diet.

When coconut oil is added to...

Read more

temp-post-image

Too much stress in your life doesn’t just affect your mental well being, it wreaks havoc on your body and could lead to symptoms mirroring those of hypothyroidism.


Types of Stress


Stress comes in a number of ways, some impacting us more than others and at different times in our lives. At some point in time, most of us will experience stress in some (or all) of these forms:




  • Financial stress




  • Relationships




  • Schedules




  • Commutes




  • Raising children




  • The stock market




  • Skipping meals




  • Living a “western” lifestyle




There are other factors not commonly considered when people think of “stress” which also burden the adrenal glands. Fluctuating blood sugar is the most common way that adrenal ...

Read more

temp-post-image

I have to admit for several years now, I have been resistant to personally doing intermittent fasting. I have a fairly stressful, fulfilled life as a nutritionist in practice and as a CEO of two companies. To be honest, I felt that intermittent fasting would be too hard on my cortisol and leptin control. But, I am also a body hacker and often use my body as the N=1 experiment so I decided to give intermittent fasting a trial run.


First, I dug into the research of Dr. Varaday and alternate day fasting. (Click here to read about the different types of fasts.) In her experiments, Varady’s subjects did alternate day fasting in which they ate a 500-calorie meal for lunch on one day — ...

Read more

temp-post-image

Intermittent fasting isn’t for everyone. As mentioned in my previous blogs on this topic, those with adrenal fatigue and poor insulin control cannot jump into intermittent fasting overnight. It takes a skilled plan to move you from feeding frequency to control blood sugar — the often quoted three meals and two snacks a day to insulin sensitivity and then reducing the number of meals you have to three per day with no snacks and no crashes between meals. This must be done before embarking on intermittent fasting or you most likely will not get the benefits you desire from intermittent fasting.


But there is a darker side to intermittent fasting — It can lead to orthorexia, a d...

Read more

temp-post-image

Intermittent fasting can be used for weight loss and several hundred studies over the years show that in addition to inducing weight loss, it can improve immune regulation, slow the aging process and induce autophagy (degradation) of decayed and damaged cells. Intermittent fasting may work for some but there are caveats to starting a program that involves extending fasting.


First, you must also understand that intermittent fasting does not mean fasting for a period of time then eating off-the-rails the rest of the time. For intermittent fasting to work, you must eat healthy and appropriately on the non-fasting days to see the effects, especially if your goal is to lose weight. You also need ...

Read more

temp-post-image

What is intermittent fasting?


Intermittent fasting is the practice of alternating intervals feeding and fasting. The most popular method of intermittent fasting will be discussed in a later article, but for now, it’s enough to mention that there are differences between fasting methods, length of time of the fasting window and the placement of meals. The fasting period on specific plans can range from 14 hours to 36 hours. Though there are different fasting methods, each specific plan has benefits.


The exception for most people is the time in which we are asleep. When you’re sleeping, you’re fasting. Most people maintain a regular fasting period of six to eight hours per nigh...

Read more

temp-post-image

We are full of fat, as an interesting review article published last year in The European Journal of Sport Sciences points out. The article, “Rethinking Fat as a Fuel for Endurance Exercise,” notes that even the leanest marathon runner has more than 30,000 kilocalories of fatty tissue in reserve — enough fat to fuel multiple marathons.


Carbohydrates, stored in the muscles as glycogen, is generally what athletes focus on as fuel because dietary fat is not as readily available as glycogen, which is easy to liberate and burn from the muscles. Before it can be used as fuel by the muscles, fat must first be broken down into fatty acids and other component. It’s this step th...

Read more

temp-post-image

Since the 1920s, very-low-carbohydrate diets or ketogenic diets have been used as a therapy for epilepsy and can, in some cases, completely remove the need for medication. Beginning in the 1960s onwards ketogenic diets became widely known as a common treatment for obesity.


A ketogenic diet isn’t just beneficial for weight loss. A high-fat, low-carb diet reduces body fat percentage and improves numerous health markers. In the last decade, research has provided evidence of the therapeutic potential of ketogenic diets in many conditions, such as: diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome, acne, neurological diseases, cancer and the improvement of respiratory and cardiovascular disease risk fact...

Read more